Road 13 Genealogy

a history of the Rudeen and Rademacher Families

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51
Adopted 
Mostrom, Jon Martis (I592)
 
52 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I596)
 
53 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I597)
 
54 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I180)
 
55 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I179)
 
56 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I115)
 
57
After the Civil War, Laban farmed in Ashmore Township of Coles County,
Illinois. Laban's brother William lived with Laban and his family for
awhile. In 1870 he farmed in Hutton Township. 
Timmons, Laban A. (I811)
 
58
After Uncle Alphonso died, Gertrude remarried. She and her second husband
were found murdered in their car. 
Jewell, Gertrude (I423)
 
59
Alice was the sister of Myrtie Lusch, and Hulda Josephine Lusch. She was married to Oscar L Hagstrom before Nils Martinson. Oscar died in a accident along with Oscar Nelson. 
Hagstrom, Alice Augusta Lusch (I6803)
 
60
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Ottilia (I2065)
 
61
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Joseph (I2095)
 
62
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Grospitch, Ernestine (I2096)
 
63
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Paul (I2097)
 
64
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Matilda (I2098)
 
65
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Alois (I2103)
 
66
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Joseph (I2104)
 
67
All from Germany:

Jos. Winkler (male, age 44)
Ernestine Winkler (female, age 51)
Johann (male, age 24)
Paul (male, age 21)
Ottilie (female, age 18)
Anna (female, age 16)
Mathilde (female, age 9)
Alois (male, age 8) 
Winkler, Annie (I2542)
 
68
Although John Dyer Timmons was farming in Ashmore Township in 1870, he is
not listed in the tax lists for Cole County. He did live in Greenville,
Illinois at one time. 
Timmons, John Dyer (I812)
 
69
Anders homesteaded on an acreage northwest of Ceresco. Nils Trued homesteaded nearby. He was completely "taken" with the young Mathilda. They were married when she was 17 at the home of her parents, Anders and Charlotta Walin. Life was very hard for her as Nils worked in Lincoln as a tailor. He often walked home to spend weekends with his family. Their first three children were born in a dugout. Mathilda often struggled with Indians, rattlers, prairie fires and the rigors of pioneer life. 
Walin, Anders (Persson) (I0364)
 
70
Anna and Fred were married in her family home, Johannes Nelson's place, at four o'clock P.M. on a Wednesday. 
Family F2103
 
71
Anna came to America in 1884 and citizen in 1895 and in the 1920 census was the head of the family. In the 1900 census she said she bore 9 children and 8 were living. 
Nilson, Anna Johnson (I6940)
 
72
Anna Charlotta married a Mr. Bjorklund and lived in Sharon Springs, KS.
They had four children together: Arther, Ernest, Bill and Agnes. 
Petersdotter, Anna Charlotta (I1496)
 
73
Anna died in Immanuel Hospital, Omaha NE. Her birth certificate, which I have, states she was born in Fridhem, NE. Her SS was 507-44-9153. 
Nelson, Anna Maria (I6747)
 
74
ARCHIE LARSON'S VISIT TO UNCLE EDWIN

Lars (Pehr) Larson arrived in America in 1854 from Sweden. He was a blacksmith at Knoxville, Illinois until he took up farming in the Mead area, later moving to Swedeburg, Nebraska.

Lars reared seven children, namely: Mrs. Henry (Sena) Peterson of Colon; Edwin, who moved to Canada to farm; Oscar who was a missionary to India for 20 years; Mrs. Oscar (Esther) Liliedahl of Swedeburg; Mrs. Emil (Minnie) Henning of Califor; Arthur who became the farmer; and David, a carpenter, and for years custodian of Luther College in Wahoo.

Arthur E. Larson was born 1881 and married Hulda Brostrom 1903. They purchased and moved to the old Louis place 1 
Larson, Archie Hilding (I0047)
 
75
Arrendrar:
Karl August Petersson, b. 7 Jan 1868,
Married 31 Dec 1893
h. Klara Lovisa eriksson, b. 16 Mar 1865
m. d. Ester Amanda Elisavet, b. 30 Sep 1891 - left home 16 Nov 1910
m. s. Karl Gunnar Petersson, b. 27 Mar 1893
h. s. Ejnar Selim Karlsson, b. 14 Dec 1889 - lef t home 12 Nov 1906
b. d. Ejra Viktoria, b. 7 Nov 1896

Another family living here also.

Also listed:
Peter Anders Johansson, b. 5 Dec 1825 
Karlsdotter, Ester Amanda Elisabet (I1572)
 
76
Arrendrar:
Karl August Petersson, b. 7 Jan 1868,
Married 31 Dec 1893
h. Klara Lovisa eriksson, b. 16 Mar 1865
m. d. Ester Amanda Elisavet, b. 30 Sep 1891 - left home 16 Nov 1910
m. s. Karl Gunnar Petersson, b. 27 Mar 1893
h. s. Ejnar Selim Karlsson, b. 14 Dec 1889 - lef t home 12 Nov 1906
b. d. Ejra Viktoria, b. 7 Nov 1896

Another family living here also.

Also listed:
Peter Anders Johansson, b. 5 Dec 1825 
Pettersson, Karl Gunnar (I1573)
 
77
Arrendrar:
Karl August Petersson, b. 7 Jan 1868,
Married 31 Dec 1893
h. Klara Lovisa eriksson, b. 16 Mar 1865
m. d. Ester Amanda Elisavet, b. 30 Sep 1891 - left home 16 Nov 1910
m. s. Karl Gunnar Petersson, b. 27 Mar 1893
h. s. Ejnar Selim Karlsson, b. 14 Dec 1889 - lef t home 12 Nov 1906
b. d. Ejra Viktoria, b. 7 Nov 1896

Another family living here also.

Also listed:
Peter Anders Johansson, b. 5 Dec 1825 
Eriksson, Klara Lovisa (I1574)
 
78
Arrendrar:
Karl August Petersson, b. 7 Jan 1868,
Married 31 Dec 1893
h. Klara Lovisa eriksson, b. 16 Mar 1865
m. d. Ester Amanda Elisavet, b. 30 Sep 1891 - left home 16 Nov 1910
m. s. Karl Gunnar Petersson, b. 27 Mar 1893
h. s. Ejnar Selim Karlsson, b. 14 Dec 1889 - lef t home 12 Nov 1906
b. d. Ejra Viktoria, b. 7 Nov 1896

Another family living here also.

Also listed:
Peter Anders Johansson, b. 5 Dec 1825

Role: Occupant 
Unknown (I1575)
 
79
Arrendrar:
Karl August Petersson, b. 7 Jan 1868,
Married 31 Dec 1893
h. Klara Lovisa eriksson, b. 16 Mar 1865
m. d. Ester Amanda Elisavet, b. 30 Sep 1891 - left home 16 Nov 1910
m. s. Karl Gunnar Petersson, b. 27 Mar 1893
h. s. Ejnar Selim Karlsson, b. 14 Dec 1889 - lef t home 12 Nov 1906
b. d. Ejra Viktoria, b. 7 Nov 1896

Another family living here also.

Also listed:
Peter Anders Johansson, b. 5 Dec 1825 
Carlsdotter, Ejra Viktoria (I2026)
 
80
At the age of 37, Nellie received an electrical shock while at work which influenced the remainder of her life. Although she was able to live alone and work in some capacity, the long term results of her injury appeared to influence her central nervous system and there seemed to be little enjoyment of life. She was "Aunt Nellie" to this writer (Maryanne Hrubesky) who knew her in the 1940s. Aunt Nellie visited her sister, Mabel Williamson, (Auntie Mabel) in Lincoln, Nebraska. She was very quiet, talked little, and did not smile. Physically she was slender, large boned and quite tall. She took no note of the young child who was present.

June 27, 1927 - Electical Injury Sustained: From The Evening State Journal and Lincoln Daily News, November 3, 1928: Nellie I. Frasier, employed as a stenographer at the state farm and improved live stock breeders' association, who received a severe electric shock June 27, 1927, when she picked up an electric fan and a telephone at the same time, causing a complete circuit, has been awarded compensation by the state compensation commission, at the rate of $65 a month from the datate of accident until disability ends, the defendants to pay their proportionate share as per their liability. The plaintiff was also awarded $139.70 which has been paid for her medical treatment. The defendants were ordered to pay $191 medical expense. Compensation was paid in this case by the University from the date of the accident until Oct. 1, 1928.

1935 - 1949 Interim Period During these years, Nellie lived in Glendale, California and likely worked at some position. None of her immediate relatives were in California so the circumstances in which she selected Glendale are unknown. Sheas unable to return home quickly in 1949 when her Mother died, but did visit in the summer. She would have returned to Lincoln to live sometime in the next two years.

Thursday, August 23, 1951 From the diary of Frank W. Hrubesky, husband of Nellie's sister, Myrtle Ruth Frasier: Yesterday morning at 5:30 Auntie Nell Frasier died at Lincoln. Some 25 years ago Nell, working at the State House in Lincolnln, in untangling the wires of a telephone and desk fan, was under electric shock for some time before they found her. Since that time, from circulatory, veinous and organic injury, she has been more or less an invalid. A pity for she was not able to enjoy a normal life thru this time.

Sunday, August 26, 1951 - Funeral Service: Friday we drove to Havelock [suburb of Lincoln] and then on to Ashland for Auntie Nell's funeral service - 2:30 at Marcy's - we five, Mabel and Pop, Clarence and Minnie, Roscoe and Lola, Chet and AliceEd and his wife, Marvin and wife, Herman and wife - Burial at Ashland beside Dad, Mom and her little sister. After the service we all gathered at Roscoe's at Ceresco for a get-together and lunch. Home again by 9:30.

All of Nellie's sisters and brothers attended her funeral. List of those mentioned above:
"we five" - sister Myrtle Frasier and husband Frank W. Hrubesky; three Hrubesky daughters
"Mabel and Pop" - sister Mabel Frasier and husband Raymond Williamson
"Clarence and Minnie" - brother Clarence Frasier and wife Minnie
"Roscoe and Lola" - brother Roscoe Frasier and wife Lola
"Chet and Alice" - brother Chester Frasier and wife Alice
"Ed and his wife" - "Marvin and his wife" - Herman and wife [Thelma]" - nephews and niece of Nellie's, children of brother Roscoe 
Frasier, Nellie Irene (I1087)
 
81
August Brodd was born in Sweden. He came to this country with his parents and 2 sisters. They moved to Wyoming and lived there several years. The family moved to Nebraska in 1882. Hilma Greenberg arrived in Swedeburg from Sweden in 1894. August farmed Mr. J. W. Johnson's farm for several years. August was president of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator of Ceresco for many years and donated many hundreds of hours of work to keep it intact during the depression years and in making it develop later into a strong business organization to serve the farmers of the community.

THE NEBRASKA STATE JOURNAL - FEBRUARY 14, 1898
August Brodd is haveing a tussle with a spell of sickness at present and is under the care of the doctor. 
Brodd, August (John August) (Johan) (I0004)
 
82
August Brodd was born in Sweden. He came to this country with his parents and 2 sisters. They moved to Wyoming and lived there several years. The family moved to Nebraska in 1882. Hilma Greenberg arrived in Swedeburg from Sweden in 1894. August farmed Mr. J. W. Johnson's farm for several years. August was president of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator of Ceresco for many years and donated many hundreds of hours of work to keep it intact during the depression years and in making it develop later into a strong business organization to serve the farmers of the community.

THE NEBRASKA STATE JOURNAL - FEBRUARY 14, 1898
August Brodd is having a tussle with a spell of sickness at present and is under the care of the doctor. 
Brodd, August (John August) (I247)
 
83
August immigrated to the US in 1868, settling in Omaha on June 13. He was first employed by the Union Pacific Railroad on a ferry boat on the Missouri River. It is believed that while he was working for the Union Pacific, he was present when the golden spike was laid completing the first transcontinental railroad at Promontory Point, Utah in 1869. In 1872, Anna Christina Olive Frostrom immigrated to the US with her mother, brother, and sisters. Her family settled on a farm in Saunders County, NE.

August became a farmer. After he and Olive Anna were married, they made their home on a farm in Mariposa precinct, where August built the farmhouse. The farm was located about 3/4 mile from the farm of Olive's parents. Like most of the farmers in the area, August hauled his grain at harvest time 40 miles to the railroad, often finding it necessary to fix the wooden bridges over the various streams he crossed.

August was a Republican and one of the first members of the Independent Party. He and Olive Anna both belonged to the Baptist Church in Weston. After August died, his son Roland inherited the home farm. In the fall of 1913, Olive Anna moved to Weston where she lived until 1941. She then moved to Wahoo where she died a year later. She was a semi-invalid for seven years before her death. She was known to have a strong faith in her religion. 
Ekdahl, August O. (I139)
 
84
Augusta came to America with her parents, and moved to Wyoming where she lived until she was 8 years old. At that time, she came with her family to Nebraska (1882). She married Carl Nelson and they farmed near the Bethlehem Covenant Church near Waverly, Lancaster, Nebraska. She died of Uremic Poisoning when she was 42. All of the Nelson children lived for a time at the Will Pearson home, in order to attend confirmation. 
Brodd, Augusta Charlota (I0005)
 
85
Augusta came to America with her parents, and moved to Wyoming where she lived until she was 8 years old. At that time, she came with her family to Nebraska (1882). She married Carl Nelson and they farmed near the Bethlehem Covenant Church near Waverly, Lancaster, Nebraska. She died of Uremic Poisoning when she was 42. All of the Nelson children lived for a time at the Will Pearson home, in order to attend confirmation.
 
Brodd, Augusta Charlotta (I248)
 
86
Augustinus was born on his father's farm near Swedeburg. He was brought up on the farm and then moved with his family to the living quarters above his father's store in Swedeburg. For a time, Augustinus worked in his father's store. His first wife, Hilda Bengtson, died from childbirth complications, three days after their daughter Hilda was born. The baby lived with Augustinus' parents until Augustinus remarried, his second wife being Hilda's sister Hermanda. Hermanda and her siblings were born on their parents' farm. After that marriage, Augustinus, Hermanda and Hilda lived on Augustinus' father's homestead farm where their son Linus was born. Augustinus farmed during this period.

In 1910, Augustinus' sister Theolina and her husband became missionaries and moved to China. Theolina had been managing the Swedeburg store. Augustinus agreed to stop farming and to manage the store. He, Hermanda, Hilda and Linus moved to a small house in Swedeburg.

Upon the death of his father in 1912, Augustinus inherited the 200 acre farm, part of which was the original homestead 80 acres. Although the deed listed a transaction price of $50 an acre, presumably there was no financial obligation incurred with the inheritance. The store in Swedeburg was sold and Augustinus, Hermanda, and the children moved back to the farm. Augustinus rented out the land as he had no great interest in either farming or money. In 1917, Hermanda inherited $5,500 from her father. Augustinus tore down the old farm house in which they were living and built a new house, paying for the material with Hermanda's inheritance. He did most of the work himself.

In 1919, Augustinus and a couple of minister friends went on a driving trip for several months, going west and visiting among other places Yellowstone Park. At another time, he made living space available in the cellar of the house for an old man, who was homeless and liked to tinker. The man was also not very well. The situation became too much for Hermanda and she made it clear that the old man was no longer welcome in their home.

Augustinus was talented with his mind and hands, designing and making equipment for the farm. An intellectual, he liked to read especially philosophy, and would often read until 4 a.m. and sleep until noon. He was not shy about expressing himself and could discuss a variety of issues. He was considered impractical by some.

Augustinus and Hermanda moved to a house in Ceresco in Oct 1936, where they lived through their retirement years.

LINCOLN JOURNAL - NOVEMBER 6, 1946

DEATHS

ERICKSON - Augustine, age 73, died Sunday evening. Funeral services Wednesday, 2. p.m. at Lutheran Church, Ceresco. Rev. A. H. Peterson officiating. Burial at Swedeburg. Nelson

WAHOO DEMOCRAT - NOVEMBER 7, 1946

AUGUSTINE ERICKSON DIES IN LINCOLN

Augustine Erickson, aged 74, passed away Sunday evening in the Lincoln General Hospital in Lincoln after a long illness. He is survived by his wife Hermanda, three sons, Linus, Joseph and Lloyd all of Ceresco; three daughters, Mrs. Hilma Erl of Tucson, Ariz., Mrs. Bernice Mostrom of Bartlesville, Okla., and Mrs. Nellie Ann Erickson at home; one brother, Herman and one sister, Miss Agatha Erickson, both of Wahoo. 
Erickson, Augustinus (I0928)
 
87
Augustinus was born on his father's farm near Swedeburg. He was brought up on the farm and then moved with his family to the living quarters above his father's store in Swedeburg. For a time, Augustinus worked in his father's store. His first wife, Hilda Bengtson, died from childbirth complications, three days after their daughter Hilda was born. The baby lived with Augustinus' parents until Augustinus remarried, his second wife being Hilda's sister Hermanda. Hermanda and her siblings were born on their parents' farm. After that marriage, Augustinus, Hermanda and Hilda lived on Augustinus' father's homestead farm where their son Linus was born. Augustinus farmed during this period.

In 1910, Augustinus' sister Theolina and her husband became missionaries and moved to China. Theolina had been managing the Swedeburg store. Augustinus agreed to stop farming and to manage the store. He, Hermanda, Hilda and Linus moved to a small house in Swedeburg.

Upon the death of his father in 1912, Augustinus inherited the 200 acre farm, part of which was the original homestead 80 acres. Although the deed listed a transaction price of $50 an acre, presumably there was no financial obligation incurred with the inheritance. The store in Swedeburg was sold and Augustinus, Hermanda, and the children moved back to the farm. Augustinus rented out the land as he had no great interest in either farming or money. In 1917, Hermanda inherited $5,500 from her father. Augustinus tore down the old farm house in which they were living and built a new house, paying for the material with Hermanda's inheritance. He did most of the work himself.

In 1919, Augustinus and a couple of minister friends went on a driving trip for several months, going west and visiting among other places Yellowstone Park. At another time, he made living space available in the cellar of the house for an old man, who was homeless and liked to tinker. The man was also not very well. The situation became too much for Hermanda and she made it clear that the old man was no longer welcome in their home.

Augustinus was talented with his mind and hands, designing and making equipment for the farm. An intellectual, he liked to read especially philosophy, and would often read until 4 a.m. and sleep until noon. He was not shy about expressing himself and could discuss a variety of issues. He was considered impractical by some.

Augustinus and Hermanda moved to a house in Ceresco in Oct 1936, where they lived through their retirement years.

--------------------------------------------------------------
WAHOO DEMOCRAT - NOVEMBER 7, 1946
------------------------------------------------------------
AUGUSTINE ERICKSON DIES IN LINCOLN
-----------------------------------------------------------
Augustine Erickson, aged 74, passed away Sunday evening in the Lincoln General Hospital in Lincoln after a long illness. He is survived by his wife Hermanda, three sons, Linus, Joseph and Lloyd all of Ceresco; three daughters, Mrs. Hilma Erl of Tucson, Ariz., Mrs. Bernice Mostrom of Bartlesville, Okla., and Mrs. Nellie Ann Erickson at home; one brother, Herman and one sister, Miss Agatha Erickson, both of Wahoo. 
Erickson, Augustinus (I228)
 
88
Augustinus was born on his father's farm near Swedeburg. He was brought up on the farm and then moved with his family to the living quarters above his father's store in Swedeburg. For a time, Augustinus worked in his father's store. His first wife, Hilda Bengtson, died from childbirth complications, three days after their daughter Hilda was born. The baby lived with Augustinus' parents until Augustinus remarried, his second wife being Hilda's sister Hermanda. Hermanda and her siblings were born on their parents' farm. After that marriage, Augustinus, Hermanda and Hilda lived on Augustinus' father's homestead farm where their son Linus was born. Augustinus farmed during this period.

In 1910, Augustinus' sister Theolina and her husband became missionaries and moved to China. Theolina had been managing the Swedeburg store. Augustinus agreed to stop farming and to manage the store. He, Hermanda, Hilda and Linus moved to a small house in Swedeburg.

Upon the death of his father in 1912, Augustinus inherited the 200 acre farm, part of which was the original homestead 80 acres. Although the deed listed a transaction price of $50 an acre, presumably there was no financial obligation incurred with the inheritance. The store in Swedeburg was sold and Augustinus, Hermanda, and the children moved back to the farm. Augustinus rented out the land as he had no great interest in either farming or money. In 1917, Hermanda inherited $5,500 from her father. Augustinus tore down the old farm house in which they were living and built a new house, paying for the material with Hermanda's inheritance. He did most of the work himself.

In 1919, Augustinus and a couple of minister friends went on a driving trip for several months, going west and visiting among other places Yellowstone Park. At another time, he made living space available in the cellar of the house for an old man, who was homeless and liked to tinker. The man was also not very well. The situation became too much for Hermanda and she made it clear that the old man was no longer welcome in their home.

Augustinus was talented with his mind and hands, designing and making equipment for the farm. An intellectual, he liked to read especially philosophy, and would often read until 4 a.m. and sleep until noon. He was not shy about expressing himself and could discuss a variety of issues. He was considered impractical by some.

Augustinus and Hermanda moved to a house in Ceresco in Oct 1936, where they lived through their retirement years.

LINCOLN JOURNAL - NOVEMBER 6, 1946

DEATHS

ERICKSON - Augustine, age 73, died Sunday evening. Funeral services Wednesday, 2. p.m. at Lutheran Church, Ceresco. Rev. A. H. Peterson officiating. Burial at Swedeburg. Nelson

WAHOO DEMOCRAT - NOVEMBER 7, 1946

AUGUSTINE ERICKSON DIES IN LINCOLN

Augustine Erickson, aged 74, passed away Sunday evening in the Lincoln General Hospital in Lincoln after a long illness. He is survived by his wife Hermanda, three sons, Linus, Joseph and Lloyd all of Ceresco; three daughters, Mrs. Hilma Erf Tucson, Ariz., Mrs. Bernice Mostrom of Bartlesville, Okla., and Mrs. Nellie Ann Erickson at home; one brother, Herman and one sister, Miss Agatha Erickson, both of Wahoo. 
Erickson, Augustinus (I8356)
 
89
Aunt Effie moved to Iowa after living for a time in Blue Rapids, Kansas. 
Hanson, Effie Marie (I83)
 
90
Aunt Emma lived with a lot of tragedy in her life. Seven of her ten
children died in infancy. Her first husband was killed in a train
accident which Emma unfortunately witnessed. A son died in a drowning
accident while in boot camp during World War I. 
Hanson, Emma Caroline (I74)
 
91
Aunt Esther lived in Colorado. 
Hanson, Esther Clarinda (I84)
 
92
Axel was brother to Olof Hagstrom. Axel was listed as servant of Andrew Carlson. Axel died of Typhoid Fever.
FAG 
Hagstrom, Axel E (I6804)
 
93
Benjamin is shown to be farming in the 1870 census in the English Twp of Iowa Co., IA. His wife is shown as Sarah, who apparently is the widow of a Mr. Coles since there are three Cole children in the household. Black children living in the ho household in 1870 include: Ruth (19), Jane (15), Edwin (13), Perry (10), William (8) and Addie (6). Benjamin was active in the early North English Christian Church. He was named as chairman of a meeting discussing the church's finances in 1868. Apparently, he was a justice of the peace or minister as B.F. Black officiated at the marriage of John Gilchrist and Rachel Goodridge in 1870. That John Gilchrist was a founding member of the North English Christian Church, and was the grandfather of John Dirom Gilchrist, who would become Benjamin Black's son-in-law. (DN)

Benjamin died of lung and kidney trouble at his home 1½ miles east of Walton, Kenton Co., KY. (LTF) 
Black, Benjamin F. (I1153)
 
94 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4230)
 
95
Bertha's SS was 505-86-3055. 
Behrens, Bertha (I6905)
 
96
Betsy came to America in 1886 and citizen in 1906 (1920 census). In 1910 she was Bessie.

1910 census

Nels Hallberg 48 Bessie Hallberg 49 Helen Hallberg 4 Bengta M Johnson 74 
Nelson, Betsy (I6938)
 
97
Betty was called Betsy, and was single. Lee Bendz says she was born in Sweden. Ostra Vemmehogs,Malmohus,Sweden. 
Martinson, Betty N (I6896)
 
98
Birth register for Kennethmont, 1865

Helen Georgina Ewing Fraser (illegitimate)

Born 4 July 1865, Mains of Law, Kennethmont

Mother: Anne Fraser, Domestic Servant
Informant: Anne Fraser
 
Fraser, Helen (I1135)
 
99
Birth: «tab»Jul. 19, 1795
Death: «tab»May 7, 1888

Family links:
Children:
John Campbell (1827 - 1913)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
wife of DUNCAN CAMPBELL

Burial:
Money Creek Cemetery
Money Creek
Houston County
Minnesota, USA

Created by: RobMinteer57
Record added: Jun 04, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 91330488
 
Campbell, Elizabeth (I1143)
 
100
Birth: «tab»Jul. 19, 1795
Death: «tab»May 7, 1888

Family links:
Children:
John Campbell (1827 - 1913)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
wife of DUNCAN CAMPBELL

Burial:
Money Creek Cemetery
Money Creek
Houston County
Minnesota, USA

Created by: RobMinteer57
Record added: Jun 04, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 91330488 
Tainsh, Elizabeth (I5857)
 

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